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dc.contributor.advisorNarahari, Y
dc.contributor.authorVallam, Rohith Dwarakanath
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-02T20:33:45Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-31T04:38:49Z
dc.date.available2018-01-02T20:33:45Z
dc.date.available2018-07-31T04:38:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-03
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://etd.iisc.ac.in/handle/2005/2955
dc.identifier.abstracthttp://etd.iisc.ac.in/static/etd/abstracts/3817/G26689-Abs.pdfen_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, the explosive growth of the Internet has led to a surge of interest to understand and predict aggregate behavior of large number of people or agents, particularly when they are connected through an underlying network structure. Numerous Internet-based applications have emerged that are as diverse as getting micro-tasks executed through online labor markets (also known as crowd sourcing) to acquiring new skills through massively open online courses (also known as MOOCs). However, there has been a major inadequacy in existing studies with respect to evaluating the impact of strategic behavior of the agents participating in such networks, crowds, and classrooms. The primary focus of this doctoral work is to understand the equilibrium behaviour emerging from these real-world, strategic environments by blending ideas from the areas of game theory, graph theory, and optimization, to derive novel solutions to these new-age economic models. In particular, we investigate the following three research challenges: (1) How do strategic agents form connections with one another? Will it ever happen that strategically stable networks are social welfare maximizing as well? (2) How do we design mechanisms for eliciting truthful feedback about an object (perhaps a new product or service or person) from a crowd of strategic raters? What can we tell about these mechanisms when the raters are connected through a social network? (3) How do we incentivize better participation of instructors and students in online edu-cation forums? Can we recommend optimal strategies to students and instructors to get the best out of these forums?en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesG26689en_US
dc.subjectGame Theoryen_US
dc.subjectNetworks-Strategic Behavioren_US
dc.subjectCrowds-Strategic Behavioren_US
dc.subjectClassrooms-Strategic Behavioren_US
dc.subjectGraph Theoryen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational Networksen_US
dc.subjectSocial Networksen_US
dc.subjectOnline Labor Marketsen_US
dc.subjectRecommender Systemsen_US
dc.subjectOnline Classroomsen_US
dc.subjectMassively Open Online Courses (MOOC)en_US
dc.subjectStrategic Networks-Localized Payoffsen_US
dc.subjectCrowdsourcingen_US
dc.subjectCrowdsourced Tree Networksen_US
dc.subjectOnline Educational Forumsen_US
dc.subjectNetwork Formation with Localized Payoffs (NFLP)en_US
dc.subjectContinuous Scoring Rulesen_US
dc.subject.classificationComputer Scienceen_US
dc.titleGame-Theoretic Analysis of Strategic Behaviour in Networks, Crowds and Classroomsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.degree.namePhDen_US
dc.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.degree.disciplineFaculty of Engineeringen_US


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